We Read: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

It is not often thatThe Name of the Rose a book becomes a true classic, one that different generations can enjoy and read nowadays just as avidly as when it was first published. Even less often, one of these true classics is made into a film that can almost match, and some even would say, surpass, the quality of the written story.

The Name of The Rose, by Umberto Eco, is one of these rare examples. Picture this: a Benedictine abbey in Northern Italy, 14th century. William of Baskerville is a Franciscan monk that arrives together with his novice Adso of Melk in the monastery and manages to gain permission to investigate the death of an illuminator that appears to have committed suicide. William is famous for his analytic mind and extraordinary deductive powers. However, nothing is what it seems in this witty, wonderful story, and as the death toll rises and victims die in more bizarre ways, it becomes harder for the reader to put this book down.

We strongly recommend you read the book first and then enjoy one of Sean Connery’s finest roles in the 1986 film of the same name. We hope you agree with us, once you’re familiar with the story, that it really is one of the best casting choices in cinema history!

One thing is for sure: whether you decide to follow our advice or to jump feet first into the audio-visual version… you will never think of libraries in the same way ever again!

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